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Thursday, October 22, 2020 | History

4 edition of Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley, 1750-1820 found in the catalog.

Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley, 1750-1820

by Margaret Elizabeth Martin

  • 95 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by The Dept. of History of Smith College in Northampton, Mass .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Connecticut River Valley,
  • Connecticut River Valley.
    • Subjects:
    • Merchants -- Connecticut River Valley.,
    • Connecticut River Valley -- Commerce.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Margaret E. Martin.
      SeriesSmith College studies in history,, vol. XXIV, nos. 1-4. October, 1938-July, 1939
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHF3151 .M36
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 284 p. incl. front. (map) diagrs.
      Number of Pages284
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6438967M
      LC Control Number42020704
      OCLC/WorldCa253021

      Greetings and well-wishes from Deep River Merchants. Deep River is a small New England town full of pride and a strong sense of history and community surrounded by the natural beauty of Southern New England and the Lower Connecticut River Valley. Following a .   The Chester-Hadlyme Ferry, which dates back merely years, crosses the Connecticut River in the shadow of Gillette Castle, providing one of the more quintessential views of the famous Connecticut dwelling-turned-tourist-attraction.. These two ferries are the last remnants of a system that began years ago and has seen more than different ferry routes come and : Erik Ofgang.

      Connecticut River Valley. The settlers in which area adopted the Fundamental Orders? Connecticut. New England merchants focused on trade with. the Indian nations of the Ohio River Valley and the Great Lakes area united to oust the British from the Ohio-Mississippi Valley. They failed and were forced to make peace in   Pioneers from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Connecticut began to settle the valley by the mid's. It didn't take long for them to thrive from a lucrative river-borne trade .

      Other Smith College studies include Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin, Shutdowns in the Connecticut Edey: A Study of Worker Displacement in a Smalllndustnd Community (Northampton, ); and Margaret E. Martin, Merchants and Trade of the Connecticut River Valley, (Northampton, ).   Some were privateers, others were merchant ships. The merchant trade was very active up and down the river throughout the war. Connecticut’s first warship, the gun brig Oliver Cromwell, was built at Uriah Hayden’s shipyard in [9] Under the cover of darkness, the Refugees proceeded towards the Connecticut coastline and then into the Author: Matthew Reardon.


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Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley, 1750-1820 by Margaret Elizabeth Martin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley, Northampton, Mass., Dept. of History of Smith College [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Thesis/dissertation: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Margaret Elizabeth Martin.

Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley, Northampton, Mass., Dept. of History of Smith Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley [] (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File:.

Merchants and Trade of the Connecticut River Valley, –By Margaret E. Martin. [Smith College Studies in History, Vol. XXIV, Nos. 1–4.]Author: Curtis Nettels. Samuel Wadsworth Russell (–) of Middletown, Connecticut, became the most well-known China trade merchant of the Connecticut River Valley.

InRussell arrived in Canton as a partner with a group of Providence, Rhode Island, : Amanda Lange. For a time after the Revolution, Connecticut's trade with the West Indies was double Boston's.

As late asMiddletown, thanks to the West Indies trade, was by one measure the busiest port. Margaret E. Martin, "Merchants and Trade in the Connecticut River Valley, ," Smith College Studies in History 24 (); Robert Paynter, Models of Spatial Inequality (New York, ).

Connecticut merchants kept this trade in motion. They collected “country produce” from outlying farmers at their stores in exchange for imported goods: English cloth, iron, glass, and crockery; East Indian silk, tea, and spices; and West Indian sugar, molasses, rum, salt, fruit, and coffee.

Connecticut River Valley, which is often considered to be some of the best farmland in New England. In addition to its abundant natural resources and fertile farmland, the Connecticut River Valley is rooted in a long history of trade, industry, and development dating from turn of the seventeenth : Madeleine Beihl.

The Duration of Book Credit in Colonial New England Merchants and trade of the Connecticut River valley, Textual analysis of 56 merchant account books from Connecticut and Author: David T. Flynn. 27 Martin, Margaret E., Merchants and Trade of the Connecticut River Valley, – (Smith College Studies in History, Vol.

XXIV, No. 1, – ), p. Daybooks, how ever, are books of first, rough entry and can be expected Cited by: 9. American trade, the active influence of a leading English merchant on the North American merchants in the transatlantic trade. London, not Merchants and Trade of the Connecticut River Valley, (Northampton, Mass., ); and Philip L.

White, The Beekmanr Mercantile Papers, (New York, ). Nestled alongside the Connecticut River, Deep River has the charm and warmth of the quintessential New England town while surrounded by the natural beauty of Southern New England and the Lower Connecticut River Valley. Once considered the Queen of the Valley, we are now one of the best kept secrets along the Connecticut River.

The Connecticut River’s importance as a trade route continued to increase, with English settlers moving up into New Hampshire and Vermont in search of pelts and other marketable goods. By the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the river boasted a robust shipbuilding industry and became a vital route for transporting lumber.

fifty years ago, Margaret Martin wrote an extremely useful study, Merchants and Trade of the Connecticut River Valley,and her work is still an important source.3 If the book has a limitation, it is a failure to analyze rural merchants within the context of community life. Margaret Elizabeth Martin has written: 'Merchants and trade of the Connecticut river valley, ' -- subject(s): Commerce, Merchants.

Toby Ditz explores the relationship among inheritance, kinship, and the commercialization of agriculture. Comparing four upland communities with a Connecticut River Valley town, she finds that inheritance practices in the late colonial era heavily favored some male heirs and created shared rights in by: InSherman and Rutledge did make a deal over slavery that was not finally undone until Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in the middle of the Civil War.

Sources for this. The Connecticut River: New England's Historic Waterway [Delaney, Edmund Thomas] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Connecticut River: New England's Historic Waterway5/5(1). In the decades following the Connecticut River's discovery by Europeans, the numerous shallows and oxbow bends of the river limited the river’s potential as a trading hub.

However, throughout the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries, maritime trade along the Connecticut River slowly and steadily grew. An Account of the Slave Trade on the Coast of Africa. New York: AMS Press, First published in Falconbridge, Anna Maria. Narrative of Two Voyages to the River Sierra Leoneduring the YearsLiverpool, UK: Liverpool University Press, Farrow, Anne.

“Beyond Complicity: The Forgotten Story of Connecticut Slaveships.”. “Merchants and Trade of the Connecticut River Valley, ” Smith College Studies in History. Department of History, Smith College: Northampton, Mass.

The focus of Thomas' work was to examine the socio-economic relations as they developed between settlers and Indians in the Connecticut River Valley during the first 30 years of white settlement.

He began by establishing what indigenous and white communities This is an Anthropology dissertation published in and as such, is now a bit dated 3/5.Because the West Indies emerged as a key point in this trade expansion and because of the Connecticut River Valley's long established connections with the Islands trade, the trade boom had a significant positive impact on the Connecticut River Valley economy.(19) In each year after the region's trade with the West Indies expanded, reaching.